October 30, 2008
Posted By: ellen

Reusable Bag

Last week I was in Italy for a wedding, and I noticed this reusable grocery bag in a supermarket. (They’ve imposed a 3 cent tax on all plastic bags, so almost everyone uses reusable bags.) What I like about this bag, aside from the cute illustration on the front, is the compartments on the inside. Perfect to hold a few bottles of wine, or simply keep your groceries from sliding into a big ball in the center of the bag. The bag costs 1 euro (or about $20 with the current exchange rate).

October 26, 2008
Posted By: Sheri

Last week we attended the Cooper Hewitt National Design Awards. While all the attention was justifiably on the recipients, (my former boss, Michael Bierut of Pentagram received the Design Mind award and our friend, colleague, and recent Spark host, Scott Stowell, received this year’s Graphic Design award), I found myself enamored with a bunch of seat cushions gradating in color, stacked, and arched between 2 chairs, suspend from the ceiling. A rainbow in the sky.

The event design and concept was created by the fabulous team at David Stark Designs in conjunction with 2 high school students from the Cooper-Hewitt’s Lehman Scholar program. And while the overall look and feeling in the tent was an explosion of Dr. Suess colors-meets-Alice and Wonderland whimsy, the theme was actually “simply green.”

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October 23, 2008
Posted By: Sheri

I recently spotted this shopping bag at an upscale sandwich shop and took pause. What is this bag made of? The fine print reads:

This environmentally responsible plastic bag is based upon oxo-biodegradeable technology and will first degrade, then biodegrade in the presence of moistrure, micro-organisms, oxygen & soil.

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October 21, 2008
Posted By: Sheri

Yesterday Marc and I had the pleasure of participating in the Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum’s Teen Design Fair. This was our second year of joining well known graphic, fashion, industrial designers and architects to speak to high school students on what it means to pursue a career in art and design. The program is part of National Design Week at the museum and the purpose is to bring awareness to the design professions as a whole.

Participants at the fair have included: Issac Mizrahi, Liz Lange, Cynthia Rowley, Milton Glaser, Deborah Adler, Ema Frigerio from C&G Partners, Georgianna Stout of 2×4, Brian Chui of Smart Design, Michael Chung of IDEO, Gregory Stanford of the Rockwell Group, and our personal favorite, Tim Gunn of Project Runway. Not a bad crowd to be associated with.

 

October 20, 2008
Posted By: Marc

MSLK has won an American Graphic Design Award from Graphic Design USA for the Wigwam Packaging Re-branding. Over 10,000+ were entered, with only 15% of entrants recognized with Certificates of Excellence in categories such as packaging, print, web, advertising, motion graphics, and point-of-purchase.

We’re incredibly thrilled. It was a great honor to be selected, and a testament to the hard work and many months of hard work everyone in the studio put into it.

Now that it’s cold weather…. go out and buy yourself a pair. (My current fave: Camouflage F2225.)

October 17, 2008
Posted By: Marc

Recently, Viximo, a cutting-edge start up company, invited MSLK to participate in a unique think-tank format which gathered what the organizers described as visual “rock stars” and “Digital DaVincis“: prominent designers, animators, programmers, and artists.

The W Hotel in San Francisco set the tone for a funky sophistication as we gathered in the plush surroundings of the meeting hall. The purpose was to brainstorm new ideas for “virtual goods,” an emerging, very lucrative market which the hosts sought to capitalize on.

Clearly, there’s an emerging trend of companies who see the value of looking outside for fresh ideas to spur innovation from within, and finding new ways to do it.

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October 17, 2008
Posted By: Marc

last week I stayed in San Francisco a few days longer to make the trip more worthwhile, and it was quite inspirational. Beyond the amazing weather, food, and people, SF itself has much to offer (and much to show NYC at times) about art and design.

Most intriguing was each neighborhood’s street banners. My favorites were the Lower Haight district which featured a different artist and designer for each sign. Some of my favorites can be seen after the jump…

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October 16, 2008
Posted By: Marc

On a recent trip to Whole Foods, something caught our eye that was so incredibly simple, so obvious, that it made us wonder why it hasn’t always been this way: A biodegradable flowerpot.

Instead of buying flowers in the standard plastic pot which you inevitably dispose of after transplanting the plant into your garden, this eco-friendly, unbelievably easy solution literally embodies the concept of sustainable design, the pot returns to soil itself. No mess, no fuss. Just dig a hole, and set it in. Even the tag is biodegradable making doing good practically effortless.

If you want to keep these on your stoop, that’s fine, too. In most cases, the pot will outlast the flowers. Once you’re done, simply put whole thing into your compost bin.

Why isn’t everything designed this way?

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October 16, 2008
Posted By: Sheri

Heading into their 8th season, my softball team the Pigeons are still going strong. It was certainly a love of my hometown baseball team, the St. Louis Cardinals that inspired me to throw the name, The Pigeons into the ring eight years ago. It was certainly the Cardinals classic logo of the two birds perched upon a bat that inspired Aaron Meshon to illustrate our logo with five soft and cushy looking birds roosting together as if taking a nap.

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October 14, 2008
Posted By: Sheri

Recently at the HBA Expo, I attended a lecture by Jane Bickerstaffe, the director of INCPEN, the Industry Council for Packaging & the Environment. When discussing innovation in sustainable packaging, one can usually expect to hear the same topics covered, reduction of the packaging weight/thickness, use of recycled or bio materials, reduction of overall packaging components. However, Jane wanted to point out something entirely new. The carbon footprint of the packaging of a product is really just one tiny spec in the overall life cycle and eco-footprint of the product it contains. In short, packaging protects far more resources than it expends by proportion. So if you reduced the thickness of your packaging and the product inside became damaged as a result, the amount you sought to save would be wasted by 10 or 20 fold.

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